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Research Staff

Resources

Areas of Expertise

  • Capital Markets
  • Countries in Transition
  • Debt Relief
  • Emerging Markets
  • Financial Crises
  • Financial Markets
  • Foreign Aid
  • Macroeconomic Policy

Peter Boone

Peter Boone has been a nonresident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute since 2011. He is a visiting senior fellow at the London School of Economics (LSE) and a principal at Salute Capital Management. He is also chairman and cofounder of Effective Intervention, a UK-based charity created in 2005 that designs programs to improve children's health, literacy, and numeracy with the critical distinction of including stringent measurement of outcomes of each program that meet evidentiary standards agreed by leading medical statisticians. He has written and published extensively on measures that can be taken to help those growing up in extremely poor regions better integrate with the increasingly wealthy world around them.

Previously he was head of research and senior partner at Brunswick-UBS, an investment bank based in Moscow. From 1993 to 1997 he was a lecturer in economics and director of the emerging markets finance program at the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE. He has served as a resident macroeconomic adviser to the governments in Russia, Poland, Ukraine, and Mongolia.

His current research interests include the causes of and solutions to recent and nascent financial crises. During 2009–10 he was a member of the LSE Future of Finance group, which brought together some of Britain's leading academics, policymakers, and financial-market participants for one year to discuss and recommend measures to prevent future financial crises. He is particularly interested in the systemic risks in Europe, Japan, and the United States posed by political systems that tend to create large implicit liabilities for the state, while promoting rather than restricting moral hazard in the financial and corporate world. He earned a PhD in economics from Harvard University in 1990.